Matthew Rosen

MArch I

Procedural Tectonics

Advised by John May

Like gravity or matter itself, the tools we use have deeply formative effects on the things we make. Because these tools are almost always inherited, we tend to see the choices we make with them rather than the choice to use them at all as critical. And yet, using 3-D modeling software is far from a neutral act. These tools come freighted with the poetics and problematics of our contemporary, statistically driven moment. They hold within the logical structure of their procedure, a deep truth of our epoch; everything is possible at once, and it is our choices, not material limits that are operative.

Architecture has a rich history of embodying culture. Implicitly or self- consciously, aesthetic expression is what fundamentally defines architectural practice. Yet the tools we use, the objects most entangled in our work and in our historical moment, are rarely elevated to the status of process. 3-D modeling is rarely considered in the reciprocity between design and construction.

How then, do we recognize the values of modeling and express its logics in our architecture? What does it mean to take seriously the differences in labor time between modeling, design, and construction? What are the aesthetics of an architecture that expresses the procedures of 3-D modeling in its construction? Procedural Tectonics explores these ideas through the construction of tensile architectures. The project draws from the rich history of tent making to consider how the tools of our moment shape our work and our buildings.

Matthew Rosen, MArch I. 
Photograph of a medical tent in front of ruins.
Matthew Rosen, MArch I.
Photo of Mid Tent.
Matthew Rosen, MArch I.
Photo of Mid Tent with person.
Matthew Rosen, MArch I.
Photo of Final Tent.
Matthew Rosen, MArch I.
Photo of Mid, , and Final Tents with people.
Matthew Rosen, MArch I.
Photo of Final Tent.
Font Resize