David Rosenwasser

MDes

Building a Digital Gallery

Advised by Jacob Reidel

This project works toward building a technology platform, community, and database for designers and design enthusiasts. The subject matter is furniture, both innovative (new) designer works and iconic (vintage) classics of 20th-century design.

The platform seeks to engage 3D scanning, videography, and high-resolution photography to challenge the current standards for viewing furniture and designed objects online today. Creating an immersive digital gallery experience is a notable objective. To initiate this, a collection of iconic furniture was 3D scanned and hosted digitally, allowing for an intimate experience of the objects’ details and imperfections. 

To build community and trust, the project engages an editorial voice and robust historical dialogue. This includes short essays on important designers and iconic furniture pieces. It also intertwines opinion pieces and critical viewpoints within the online experience. Curation and the subject of authenticity both play crucial roles. Curation requires explicit knowledge of the relationships between varying design pieces in their date of production, material, and design ethos. Showcasing the criteria for authenticity and verifying them builds trust and value for users.

Lastly, the project places considerable emphasis on researching the state of the art in e-commerce, web development, advertising, visualization technologies, online surveying, and 3D scanning hardware. These fields and their complex networks become interdependent for this buildout of a digital platform intended for community use.

The project works alongside the thesis trajectory of Jeremy Bilotti, SMArchS Computation and MS in Computer Science candidate, MIT.

A side view of a metal and leather folding chair

Side view of a wooden table with a top made of a cross-section of tree in its natural irregular round shape, with a single wooden leg slightly off-center attached to a single wooden base at a right angle to leg.
Rendered 3D scan of a Mira Nakashima burl end table via structured light scanner. Produced in collaboration with Jeremy Bilotti at MIT.

View from above of a wooden table with a top made of a cross-section of tree in its natural irregular round shape, with a single wooden leg slightly off-center attached to a single wooden base at a right angle to leg.
Perspective view of 3D-scanned table, showing resolution and clarity of the digital interpretation. Produced in collaboration with Jeremy Bilotti at MIT.

View from below of a wooden table with a top made of a cross-section of tree in its natural irregular round shape, with a single wooden leg slightly off-center attached to a single wooden base at a right angle to leg.
View of Nakashima table underside, showing refinement of textured detail, with slight imperfections in the base alignment. Produced in collaboration with Jeremy Bilotti at MIT.

Three images of a stool side-by-side, the first is white, the second is red, and the third is salmon-colored.
Comparison of untextured 3D scan, texture-mapped 3D scan, and photograph. Emeco Broom chair shown by Philippe Starck. Produced in collaboration with Jeremy Bilotti at MIT.

Two images of the words “broom made from industrial waste.” The top image is photographic quality of the words embossed in a surface material, the bottom image is an abstracted blurry version of the words.
Fidelity of 3D scan for furniture application. It is refined enough to pick up on raised lettering, though rough enough to maintain a reasonable file size. Comparison shown with photograph. Produced in collaboration with Jeremy Bilotti at MIT.